Dead Mom Walking: A Memoir of Miracle Cures and Other Disasters

October 31, 2020
Dead Mom Walking: A Memoir of Miracle Cures and Other Disasters

"A hilarious memoir of effervescent misadventures."—Toronto Star"How am I laughing at someone's mother's cancer? How? We thinkwe can't laugh about death, about cancer, about our mothers andtheir suffering . . . and we can't, but we can. And there's so muchrelief in that. I laughed, I cried, I laughed and laughed andlaughed." —Carolyn Taylor, BARONESS VON SKETCH SHOWA traumedy about life and death (and every cosmic jokein between)When her mother is diagnosed with cancer, Rachel Matlow isconcerned but hopeful. It's Stage 1, so her mom will get surgeryand everything will go back to normal. But growing up in Rachel'sfamily, there was no normal. Elaine, an alternative school teacherand self-help junkie, was never a capital M "Mommy"—she spent moretime meditating than packing lunches—and Rachel, who played hockeywith the boys and refused to ever wear a dress, was no ordinarydaughter.When Elaine decides to forgo conventional treatment and healherself naturally, Rachel is forced to ponder whether the verythings that made her mom so special—her independent spirit, herbelief in being the author of her own story—are what willultimately kill her. As the cancer progresses, so does Elaine'sconviction in doing things her way. She assembles a dream team ofalternative healers, gulps down herbal tinctures with every meal,and talks (with respect) to her cancer cells. Anxious and confused,Rachel is torn between indulging her pie-in-the-sky pursuits(ayahuasca and all) and pleading with the person who's taking hermother away.With irreverence and honesty—and a little help from Elaine'sjournals and self-published dating guide, plus hours ofconversations recorded in her dying days—Matlow brings herinimitable mother to life on the page. Dead Mom Walking is thehilarious and heartfelt story of what happens when two peoplewho've always written their own script go head to head with eachother, and with life's least forgiving plot device.