Inside the Company: CIA Diary

October 30, 2020
Inside the Company: CIA Diary

There are no blanks in Philip Agee's Inside the Company: CIADiary. This densely detailed expose names every CIA officer, everyagent, every operation that Agee encountered during 12 years with"The Company" in Ecuador, Uruguay, Mexico and Washington.Among CIA agents or [contacts] Agee lists high ranking politicalleaders of several Latin American countries, U.S. and LatinAmerican labor leaders, ranking Community Party members, and scoresof other politicians, high military and police officials andjournalists.After a stint as an Air Force officer (for cover) and CIAtraining, Agee arrived in Quito, Ecuador in late 1960. During theglory years of the Alliance for Progress and the New Frontier, hefought the holy war against communism by bribing politicians andjournalists, forging documents, tapping telephones, and readingother people's mail.But it was a faraway event which seems to have disturbed himmore. Lyndon Johnson's invasion of the Dominican Republic in 1965was an overreaction Agee couldn't accept. In 1968, he resigned withthe conviction that he had become a "servant of the capitalism Irejected" as a university student -- "one of its secretpolicemen."Agee decided to write this reconstructed diary to telleverything he knew. He spent four years writing the book in Europe,making research trips and dodging the CIA. At one point he lived onmoney advanced by a woman he believes was working for the CIA andtrying to gain his confidence.Until recently, former CIA Director Richard Helm's plea that"You've just got to trust us. We are honorable men" was enough.With the revelations of domestic spying, it no longer is.In this book Agee has provided the most complete description yetof what the CIA does abroad. In entry after numbing entry, U.S.foreign policy in Latin America is pictured as a web of deceit,hypocrisy and corruption. Now that we can no longer plead ignoranceof the webs our spiders spin, will we continue to tolerate CIAactivities abroad?