Logical Fictions in Medieval Literature and Philosophy (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, Book 93)

December 1, 2020
Logical Fictions in Medieval Literature and Philosophy (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, Book 93)

In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, new ways ofstorytelling and inventing fictions appeared in the French-speakingareas of Europe. This new art still influences our global cultureof fiction. Virginie Greene explores the relationship betweenfiction and the development of neo-Aristotelian logic during thisperiod through a close examination of seminal literary andphilosophical texts by major medieval authors, such as Anselm ofCanterbury, Abélard, and Chrétien de Troyes. This study of OldFrench logical fictions encourages a broader theoretical reflectionabout fiction as a universal human trait and a defining element ofthe history of Western philosophy and literature. Additional closereadings of classical Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle, andmodern analytic philosophy including the work of Bertrand Russelland Rudolf Carnap, demonstrate peculiar traits of Westernrationalism and expose its ambivalent relationship to fiction.